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ANSWERED on Sat 16 May 2009 - 1:39 am UTC by easterangel

Question: How Much Do These Trees Weigh?

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Fri 15 May 2009 - 5:10 am UTC

Question

erstiv
Customer

How much does an average, full grown (i.e. a tree that has reached the majority of its average final growth...say 40-50 years?), Teak, Mahogany, and Ebony tree weigh?  Preferably, these tree weights would correspond to these trees grown in central Africa but if weights are only available for other tropical/sub-tropical regions that will be acceptable.  Thanks!

 
 

Fri 15 May 2009 - 9:49 am UTC

Comment

Weighing plants has many difficulties. Do you include below ground parts, seeds, fruit, leaves, or just wood. Most reported results are dry weight to eliminate water weight variables. The next difficulty with trees or woody perennials is age. Very mature plants have sizes that to not permit easy handling so trees are measured according to their girth at breast height and their total height. Measurements are used to estimate biomass.

 

Fri 15 May 2009 - 10:49 am UTC

Request for clarification

easterangel
Former Researcher

Hi erstiv!

Would averages be enough and should the figures be from central Africa only or is it ok to relax on this requirement?

Regards!

 

Fri 15 May 2009 - 3:35 pm UTC

Question clarification

erstiv
Customer

hey easterangel!  Averages would be enough as long as the average specifies that they are talking about a 'full grown' tree.  e.g. if you found a source that said something like "ebony trees often reach 50 feet in height, with a diameter of 6 feet and can weigh as much as 10,000 lbs," that would be fine.  I would prefer central africa but, as long as they are not two dramatically different climates or species of tree, another source would be acceptable.

Devilsnani has some good points as well.  As far as below ground parts I have found that a rule of thumb is to add 20% to the total weight of the tree if all you have is above ground weight.  Dry weight is just fine as long as it is specified. 

Thanks!

 

Sat 16 May 2009 - 1:39 am UTC

Answer

easterangel
Former Researcher

Hi erstiv!

The following articles provide the estimated weight averages of the following types of trees. The sources are applicable to African trees. They are measured per cubic feet.

Mahogany - 32 to 34 pounds per cubic foot
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/African+mahogany+winning+over+Cuban+mahogany+fans.+(Wood+of+the+Month)-a090934437

Teak -30 to 49 pounds per cubic foot
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Muninga+yields+great+wood+for+carving,+turnery+and+furniture.+(Wood...-a090192084

Ebony - 65 lb./cu. ft
http://worldtimbercorp.com/EbonyGaboon.htm

I hope these will be of help. Just ask for a clarification if you need further assistance as regards this particular topic.

Regards,
Easterangel

 
 

Sat 16 May 2009 - 8:54 am UTC

Comment

Just by the way... and sorry to digress.........

 My father and I worked with Red Ironbark Eucalypt, one of the heaviest timbers in the world and one of the hardest;it is like rock!!

 It weighs in at MORE than 1 tonne to the cubic meter!! Take my word for it that is extremely heavy and only bettered by 2 or theee timbers anywhere in the world. One of the more beautiful timbers of the world however in terms of colour, grain, sheen etc

 We made beautiful deep red coffee tables but very  very hard to work with such timber  ie tools break, cant fashion into shape easy,timber does not kiln dry easy and yield is only 50% from the process etc.

  Top craftsmen would occasionally make a  large dining table from this timber but charge $4000 - $5000 to the purchaser. They used to advrtise that the table would be  almost as new and unworn in 1000 years time.

 

Sat 16 May 2009 - 10:17 am UTC

Uclue Researcher Comment

Roger Browne
Researcher

John, I know what you mean about ironbark. Forty years ago a large chunk of ironbark provided the only means to scramble up a rock crevice to a cave I used to visit as a child.

A couple of years ago I revisited the spot and was amazed that the same piece of wood was still there, doing the same job, looking just as it did decades previously.

Incidentally, one tonne per cubic meter is around 62 pounds per cubic foot, so ironbark and ebony are in the same league weightwise.

 

Sat 16 May 2009 - 6:31 pm UTC

Request for clarification

erstiv
Customer

Thanks Easterangel!  This gets us halfway there but I need to know how much an actual average adult tree weighs, so in order to determine how much with the information you provided, we would also need to know how many cubic feet of wood these trees contained...any thoughts?

Thanks!

 

Sat 16 May 2009 - 11:58 pm UTC

Comment

myoarin
User

Here are a couple of sites with formula for estimating timber volume:
http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/uf/lab_exercises/calc_board_footage.htm
http://homepages.caverock.net.nz/~bj/volume.htm
    (Sorry about the last one.  I complained that it is hard to read.)

Easterangel's first two links mentioned average tree height.

This site says that ebony trees can grow to 50 feet:
http://www.thewoodbox.com/data/wood/ebony-info.htm

In addition, one needs the "dbh" (diameter breast height, 4.5 ft from the ground). 
This site mentions some averages for teak (but the differences in height?):
http://www.citeulike.org/article/3632075

And here, for mahogany, Caribbean:
http://www.fs.fed.us/global/iitf/pubs/ja_iitf_2008_wadsworth001.pdf

For ebony (slender trees), Google's excerpt:
"Species Information
(Trade name) : African blackwood, African ebony, mugembe, poyi ... Average dbh at maturity is less than 38 cm, although trees have been found with a dbh of ..."
www.worldagroforestrycentre.org/sea/Products/AFDbases/af/asp/SpeciesInfo.asp?SpID=643
http://www.worldagroforestrycentre.org/sea/Products/AFDbases/af/asp/SpeciesInfo.asp?SpID=643
That link may have more information about all three varieties, but one would have to search through it.

 

Sun 17 May 2009 - 10:10 pm UTC

Answer clarification

easterangel
Former Researcher

Hi!

Does the comment of Myoarin provide the answer to your clarification? It looks pretty extensive since it even provides the formula and some of the data missing needed to manipulate the computation.

Regards!

 

Tue 19 May 2009 - 4:34 pm UTC

Accepted and rated

erstiv
Customer

I guess that might get me close enough...

 

Fri 22 May 2009 - 2:46 pm UTC

Uclue Researcher Comment

richard
Researcher

The densities noted, one tonne per cubic meter or 62 pounds per cubic foot, are identical to the density of water. 

(And of course the density of water at 4 degrees C is the benchmark for the metric system, in that one tonne per cubic meter = 1 kg per litre.)
http://www.simetric.co.uk/si_water.htm

 

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