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ANSWERED on Wed 28 Apr 2010 - 3:30 pm UTC by redhoss

Question: I beam calculation & size

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Tue 27 Apr 2010 - 11:03 pm UTC

Question

schneibert
Customer

I try to find out the dimension of steel beam that I will need to support a two stories house.The house is going to be 3/2 down and 3/2 at the top.my question is to find the size of beam that i can use to support the wood truss for the first roof and the attic of the first floor? The basement of the house will be in block (US code)and the top floor will be in wood.So I want to make sure if an earthquake hits maybe things do not collapse like a pile of trash.I saw this type of support in many small commercial  house that i work on before  as electrician. Your should include the depth for the beam to be underground .the basement will 12 ft high including the 2ft roof.the second top will be 14 ft to the bottom of the attic.width 33 ft and length 57ft. I am thinking three line of support at every 18ft. Please help me . I hope you understand even i can't use technical word for that matter. I would prefer "Redhoss.ga" but anyone that can help.Basically it's just to support the truss  and the attic.

 
 

Wed 28 Apr 2010 - 3:30 pm UTC

Uclue Researcher Answer

redhoss
Researcher

Hello schneibert, I had to read your question several times before I got it. I read that you want to only support only the 1st floor loads and the beam will be supported so that the longest span will be 57' divided by 3 or 19' (you say 18'). I am using a 30psf live load and 15psf dead load. I calculate a required moment of inertia = 115in^4. Good beam choices are:

W12x19 depth = 12.16" weight 19 #/ft
W10x25 depth = 10.08" weight 25 #/ft
W8x35  depth =  8.12" weight 35 #/ft

Please ask for a clarification if this is not what you intended or you have any further questions.

 
 

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