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ANSWERED on Tue 3 Jul 2007 - 7:29 pm UTC by pinkfreud

Question: The Two Greatest Words in the English Language

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The customer tipped the researcher $10.00

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probo 

Customer

 3 Jul 2007 18:04 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 6:04 pm UTC 

Yeah, I know, there are lots of candidates but I want a definitive duo that will stand the Test of Time so that, a Millennium from now, Wiki will cite this Answer as THE authority.

'Blair Quits' will surely fail the Millennium Test so a lot of thought has to go into this ...

And, please note, I am a 'Hard Taskmaster' ...

Hey, that fits!

Bryan 

 

pinkfreud 

Answer

 3 Jul 2007 19:29 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 7:29 pm UTC 

Dear Bryan,

(Of course, "Dear Bryan" is two words, but I'm not nominating them as the two "greatest," since they would surely fail the Test of Time, except with people named "Bryan.")

I have put on my thinking cap: this seems to sharpen up the brain's little grey cells, although it musses my hair (which, I am glad to say, contains few little grey cells of its own.) These are my choices as the ten all-time greatest two-word phrases:

YOU WIN
MARRY ME
I'M HOME
THANK GOD
FREE BEER
NO CANCER
NOT GUILTY
WAR'S OVER
YOU'RE HIRED
WE'RE PREGNANT

As proof that a lot of thought went into this, here is a pic of me in my thinking cap:

http://www.mortalwombat.com/Special/Thinking_Cap.jpg

Best always,
Pink

 

myoarin 

User

 3 Jul 2007 19:45 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 7:45 pm UTC 

I wonder how long it would have taken Pink without her thinking cap,
and I very much like the choices, and I won't carp about hyphenated words.

Is Bryan going to write the Wikipedia entry?

Myo

 

anonsi 

User

 3 Jul 2007 20:06 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 8:06 pm UTC 

Luckily for you, Myo, there aren't any hyphenated words.  Although there are a couple of contractions.

Love the list, Pink.

 

ribuck 

User

 3 Jul 2007 21:02 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 9:02 pm UTC 

The Two Greatest Words in The English Language are surely "English" and "Language", because "The" is not so great.

 

Roger Browne 

Researcher

 3 Jul 2007 21:07 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 9:07 pm UTC 

Do you guys also have "Love Heart" sweets in your countries? Here's a picture:

   Love Hearts - Traditional Old-Fashioned Sweets
   http://www.mrsbrowns.co.uk/acatalog/LOVE_HEARTS.html

They all have short phrases, mostly two words, e.g.:

   KISS ME
   BE MINE
   SAY YES
   HOLD ME
   EVER YOURS
   NICE GIRL
   HOT LIPS
   YOU WIN

Actually, those are from the photo, but they must have updated these sweets because the ones my kids bring home have words like:

   EMAIL NOW
   ITS LATE
   LUV LOL
   TEXT ME
   HUGZ KISSZ

But I'll nominate the definitive duo as the wedding vow:

   I DO

 

Roger Browne 

Researcher

 3 Jul 2007 21:10 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 9:10 pm UTC 

Heh, I just did a Google wildcard search:

   "the two greatest words are * *"
   http://www.google.com/search?q=%22the+two+greatest+words+are+*+*%22

It returned exactly three results:

   the two greatest words are "open bar"
   the two greatest words are "encased meat"
   the two greatest words are "opening day"

As the Americans like to say:

   GO FIGURE

 

pinkfreud 

Researcher

 3 Jul 2007 21:10 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 9:10 pm UTC 

Ribuck, that's an excellent point.

I am very glad that you did not mention words that end in "-gry".

 

myoarin 

User

 3 Jul 2007 23:19 UTCTue 3 Jul 2007 - 11:19 pm UTC 

Yeah, Anonsi, and I had to look up how to spell "hyphenated" ..
(I was about to go with the 456 websites that have "hyphonated".)

A millennium from now, they'll all be speaking Chinese, and only students of the arcane will know about late  - as in deceased - English.

Myo

 

feilong 

Researcher

 4 Jul 2007 03:05 UTCWed 4 Jul 2007 - 3:05 am UTC 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY
LOVE YOU or LUV YA
THANK YOU

Who knows, a millennium from now, people will say

UCLUE ROCKED
UCLUE RULES

But that's just wishful thinking. :-D

 

probo 

Customer

 4 Jul 2007 04:26 UTCWed 4 Jul 2007 - 4:26 am UTC 

Actually, Pink, my choices are:

FANTASTIC ANSWER

AS ALWAYS

LOVELY PICTURE

MANY THANKS

Bryan

 

pinkfreud 

Researcher

 4 Jul 2007 04:34 UTCWed 4 Jul 2007 - 4:34 am UTC 

Bryan,

Many thanks for the tip!

~Pink

 

markvmd 

User

 4 Jul 2007 05:07 UTCWed 4 Jul 2007 - 5:07 am UTC 

My 2p. These never fail to get my attention.


Surf's up
Nominal profile
Five by (it's really "five by five" but this is common shorthand)
Pickled Herring
Pickled eggs
Pickled daikun
Anything pickled
Especially me.

 

Phil Answerfinder 

Researcher

 4 Jul 2007 07:47 UTCWed 4 Jul 2007 - 7:47 am UTC 

I look at the question from a different view. I nominate Set and Run.

"What word has the most definitions?

"Set" has 464 definitions in the Oxford English Dictionary. "Run" runs a distant second, with 396. Rounding out the top ten are "go" with 368, "take" with 343, "stand" with 334, "get" with 289, "turn" with 288, "put" with 268, "fall" with 264, and "strike" with 250.
http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/t47.html

 

Phil Answerfinder 

Researcher

 4 Jul 2007 12:42 UTCWed 4 Jul 2007 - 12:42 pm UTC 

...and Henry James thought "summer afternoon" were the two most beautiful words.

http://history.enotes.com/famous-quotes/summer-afternoon-summer-afternoon-to-me-those-have

 

probo 

Customer

 4 Jul 2007 13:49 UTCWed 4 Jul 2007 - 1:49 pm UTC 

Phil

MANY THANKS

DON'T FORGET

HARRY JAMES

BETTY GRABLE

LOOKING FORWARD

Bryan

 

amelia 

User

 5 Jul 2007 10:06 UTCThu 5 Jul 2007 - 10:06 am UTC 

I imagine a millennium hence, we won't be speaking English, but rather
using those text messaging abbreviations often used in on-line chatting. (I'm not sure of a better label for these, but I'm referring to things like ROF LOL, IMHO), 

Anyone have any ideas on what two combinations of these 'text messaging abbreviations' would constitute 'two words' that have stood the Test of Time?


4GM 404  (Forgive me, I haven't got a clue)

Amelia

 

anonsi 

User

 5 Jul 2007 16:59 UTCThu 5 Jul 2007 - 4:59 pm UTC 

feilong:  I figure thank you won't survive the millenium test, considering how infrequently I hear it being spoken today.

Roger:  We call those Conversation Hearts in the US, and they are actually shaped like hearts.
http://www.candyfavorites.com/Conversation-Hearts-Small-pr-2595.html?gclid=CN3OjKnxkI0CFRrnPgodfFOrpQ

 

Hailstorm 

Former Researcher

 6 Jul 2007 12:32 UTCFri 6 Jul 2007 - 12:32 pm UTC 

I would think that the greatest words are the ones that are used the most often.  Using this as my source:

http://www.world-english.org/english500.htm

The greatest two words are:

THE OF

 

brudenell 

User

 7 Jul 2007 10:28 UTCSat 7 Jul 2007 - 10:28 am UTC 

 " Yes dear " may be a survivor over the coming Millenium.

 

Hailstorm 

Former Researcher

 7 Jul 2007 13:07 UTCSat 7 Jul 2007 - 1:07 pm UTC 

I'm surprised that the obvious "HELP ME" hadn't been mentioned yet.  I'm sure we will be using that phrase much more in the years to come.

 

myoarin 

User

 8 Jul 2007 05:39 UTCSun 8 Jul 2007 - 5:39 am UTC 

I don't think frequency of use assures greatness for any two words.

E.g.:  "Heil Hitler"

 

probo 

Customer

 8 Jul 2007 10:33 UTCSun 8 Jul 2007 - 10:33 am UTC 

Wirklich ist mein Ruder innen, dieses Wort verboten!

 

myoarin 

User

 8 Jul 2007 14:27 UTCSun 8 Jul 2007 - 2:27 pm UTC 

Q.E.D.  !!

 

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