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ANSWERED on Sat 7 Jan 2017 - 4:02 pm UTC by David Sarokin

Question: health and nutrition

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mortbnkr 

Customer

 6 Jan 2017 14:38 UTCFri 6 Jan 2017 - 2:38 pm UTC 

I would like to know the REAL deal with the health implications, if any, of Coke Zero and/or similar diet sodas.  I want to understand an accurate, balanced account of the pros and cons of this relative to weight loss and overall health considerations.  I would like to use this information to make some decisions about my own health and wellness, so that is the focus as opposed to a college report or something to that effect.

 

David Sarokin 

Researcher

 6 Jan 2017 19:16 UTCFri 6 Jan 2017 - 7:16 pm UTC 

mortbnkr,

Happy new year!

There are plenty of summary articles out there on this topic from reasonably trustworthy sources. For example:

http://time.com/3628546/diet-soda-bad-for-you/
Should I Drink Diet Soda?
5/5 experts say no

I imagine you've seen material like this already, and I'm not sure what more you'd like from us. I understand the desire to get to the "real deal" but the simple truth about so much nutrition/health information is that science just doesn't have a great deal of it figured out, and people are left with a lot of suggestive information and a good deal of speculation.

Take a look at the TIME article, and let us know your thoughts.

David

 

mortbnkr 

Customer

 7 Jan 2017 14:21 UTCSat 7 Jan 2017 - 2:21 pm UTC 

that is pretty much the sort of thing I had seen in my own research.   I was looking for a much more definitive answer, but it sounds like you are saying that it's probably not out there with any certainty.   Is that your sense of things.  If so, I will end my quest, pay you if you think I should, or cancel the request, depending on how you feel about it....love the service, as alway.

 

David Sarokin 

Researcher

 7 Jan 2017 14:42 UTCSat 7 Jan 2017 - 2:42 pm UTC 

There's plenty of medical literature on the topic, if that's more to your taste (I don't know how comfortable you are with this type of reading material, but usually, the one or two paragraph abstract will get you the gist of the study).

For instance, here are some of the studies that caught my eye in a PubMed search:


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=%22diet+soda%22

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage but Not Diet Soda Consumption Is Positively Associated with Progression of Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes.

Diet Soda Consumption and Risk of Incident End Stage Renal Disease.

Hormonal responses to non-nutritive sweeteners in water and diet soda.

Understanding the metabolic and health effects of low-calorie sweeteners: methodological considerations and implications for future research.

Positive association between artificially sweetened beverage consumption and incidence of diabetes.

Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts.

The skinny on diet soda. Is it time to kick artificial sugars out of the can?

Diet soda intake is associated with long-term increases in waist circumference in a biethnic cohort of older adults: the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging.


If that's useful, let me know and I'll post it as my answer. If not, please go ahead and cancel the question (or just let it expire on its own) so your fee can be refunded.

Here's to making healthy choices in 2017 (even without definitive information!).

David

 

mortbnkr 

Customer

 7 Jan 2017 15:06 UTCSat 7 Jan 2017 - 3:06 pm UTC 

yes, please post, will be helpful....

 

David Sarokin 

Answer

 7 Jan 2017 16:02 UTCSat 7 Jan 2017 - 4:02 pm UTC 

mortbnkr,


Glad to hear it. Here's the PubMed link again:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=%22diet+soda%22


along with the particular articles (with direct links) that looked to be most on-target:


Sugar-Sweetened Beverage but Not Diet Soda Consumption Is Positively Associated with Progression of Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27934644


Diet Soda Consumption and Risk of Incident End Stage Renal Disease.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27797893


Hormonal responses to non-nutritive sweeteners in water and diet soda.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27777606


Understanding the metabolic and health effects of low-calorie sweeteners: methodological considerations and implications for future research.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26936185


Positive association between artificially sweetened beverage consumption and incidence of diabetes
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26186883


Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet soda, and fatty liver disease in the Framingham Heart Study cohorts.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26055949


The skinny on diet soda. Is it time to kick artificial sugars out of the can?
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25980068


Diet soda intake is associated with long-term increases in waist circumference in a biethnic cohort of older adults: the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25780952



David

 

q21 

Researcher

 7 Jan 2017 16:48 UTCSat 7 Jan 2017 - 4:48 pm UTC 

 

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