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ANSWERED on Tue 13 Jun 2017 - 3:45 am UTC by Daniel Kniffler

Question: Which hoya variety is this?

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brudenell 

Customer

 12 Jun 2017 16:39 UTCMon 12 Jun 2017 - 4:39 pm UTC 

I have what I think is a variety of hoya plant (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoya). Common names for this genus are waxplant, waxvine, waxflower or simply hoya. I have another hoya and the leaf is identical. This plant was acquired in a post Christmas sale at a local supermarket. Originally is was wrapped around a circular frame to resemble a wreath. Once I had it a while it started sending out a vine which has now reached a great length. A quick search of the web has not revealed which type of hoya that it is. To make this more interesting most descriptions of hoyas do not have them growing much more than 6 metres but mine is over 10m and still getting longer. The bloom is larger than a clenched human fist. Unlike other common hoyas this plant in bloom doesn't seem to drip a honey like syrup. The fragrance, while pronounced, is quite pleasant and soft like a gardenia. I had tried to propagate this hoya by soaking cuttings in water, with and without rooting hormone, but it never rooted. My other hoya roots very easily in a jar of water prior to planting.



http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=dg331s&s=9

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=iyioi1&s=9

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=288ozlv&s=9

Can you tell which hoya this is?

Thank you

B

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David Sarokin 

Researcher

 12 Jun 2017 20:27 UTCMon 12 Jun 2017 - 8:27 pm UTC 

brudenell,

Hoya's all seem to have a prominent starish-shaped cluster in the center of the flowers:

https://www.google.com/search?q=hoya+vine+white+flowers&num=100&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwif266Mj7nUAhUEHD4KHeJUAG4QsAQINQ&biw=1366&bih=638


which I don't think exists for your plant (though it's hard to be sure). Since you're the man on the scene, is the cluster there, but hard to see? Or not?


David

 

Daniel Kniffler 

Researcher

 13 Jun 2017 01:25 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 1:25 am UTC 

Might it be a Stephanotis? They're a sibling genus to Hoya, so there is some likeness.

Many pictures online show Stephanotis with more pointed petals than your plant has, but it seems to be variable. The size and scent are as you describe.


http://floridagardener.com/pom/stephanotis.htm
https://www.thespruce.com/stephanotis-flowers-1315767
http://hihort.blogspot.com/2012/05/stephanotis-by-any-other-name-is.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephanotis

 

brudenell 

Customer

 13 Jun 2017 01:34 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 1:34 am UTC 

Hello David

My hoya is very similar to those in this image:
http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2psrltz&s=9

The notable difference is that mine do not have stamens. They are the same shape.

 

brudenell 

Customer

 13 Jun 2017 01:37 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 1:37 am UTC 

DK- you may have something here! St├ęphanois looks very similar. Back to you overnight if not sooner.

 

brudenell 

Customer

 13 Jun 2017 01:58 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 1:58 am UTC 

DK- Stephanotis! From your links it appears I do not have a hoya. The main exception is that my vine is much more vigorous. The photos in your links provided show flowers exactly like my plant. This is quite educational... I have learned something on Uclue tonight. Thank you. Please post.

B

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Daniel Kniffler 

Answer

 13 Jun 2017 03:45 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 3:45 am UTC 

Hi Brudenell, Glad we could help!

DK

 

brudenell 

Customer

 13 Jun 2017 10:05 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 10:05 am UTC 

Daniel Kniffler- How did you come to identify this plant and flower? Any searching skills used or was it a plant that you were familiar with? As a resident of a colder part of the world I would never see these outside however folks in the tropics have them growing in their yards. At this gflora.com discussion forum I see that there may be mango sized fruit in my future:
http://www.gflora.com/index.php?cmd=genus_body&genus_id=63

I thank you for responding to this Uclue question.

 

Daniel Kniffler 

Researcher

 13 Jun 2017 18:13 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 6:13 pm UTC 

I had to search. Although the name seems familiar in retrospect, my horticultural knowledge is pretty scanty and not up to recognising much.

It seemed that the balance of probability was that if it were a Hoya, you or David would have identified it already or would do imminently. So I speculatively assumed it wasn't a Hoya, and went looking for any white-flowered waxy-leafed vines. For things like this, I like to use image searches as an efficient way to present lots of results within the easily-described dimensions of the search space, for the brain's pattern-recognition circuits to scan through for the exact match.

 

myoarin 

User

 13 Jun 2017 20:07 UTCTue 13 Jun 2017 - 8:07 pm UTC 

Daniel seems to have a very appropriate surname or chosen researcher's name:
Kniffler, in German one who is a master at this this:
http://dict.leo.org/german-english/kniffelei 
or can answer such questions ("nouns" here):
http://dict.leo.org/german-english/kniffelig

(The translation under "verbs" is pretty far fetched and not about the verb "kniffeln".)

 

Daniel Kniffler 

Researcher

 14 Jun 2017 02:32 UTCWed 14 Jun 2017 - 2:32 am UTC 

 

brudenell 

Customer

 14 Jun 2017 02:35 UTCWed 14 Jun 2017 - 2:35 am UTC 

Thank you

 

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