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ANSWERED on Thu 29 Jun 2017 - 8:16 pm UTC by David Sarokin

Question: Dental implants: all at once of multiple sessions?

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bbronco 

Customer

 25 Jun 2017 17:01 UTCSun 25 Jun 2017 - 5:01 pm UTC 

Assuming I have no medical issues that would prevent me from having either, which is the more preferable to do: dental implants one (or few) at a time or entire mouth procedure at once?

I am trying to choose which way to go. I am aware of other options, such as bridges, but I am not interested in those options, only in implants.

One (or few) at a time (most likely under local anesthesia) is how it usually practiced by general dentists.
Entire mouth procedure at once is usually under general anesthesia, and this is how it is done by dentists doing only implant work (say at a clinic in Bangkok).

I am trying to see if there is anything I am not considering, such as maybe few implants at a time gives dentist more time and opportunity to get it right, or maybe that the entire job at one time means that this will be done by a dentist who is an expert at the implants?

 

David Sarokin 

Researcher

 26 Jun 2017 13:55 UTCMon 26 Jun 2017 - 1:55 pm UTC 

bbronco,

Thanks for reposting, and for your patience with the process here at Uclue. This link has a discussion of implants:

http://www.aestheticjawsurgery.com/blog/how-many-dental-implants-can-i-do-at-one-time
How many dental implants can I do at one time?


and considers one-at-a-time vs all-at-once from several perspectives.

There does not appear to be any advantage (in terms of outcomes, professionalism, discomfort) in spreading out the implant work over several visits, and it may well increase the overall cost due to the repeated procedures. On the other hand, there doesn't seem to be any profound disadvantage (other than cost) to the one-at-a-time approach either, if that's the patient's preference.

Let us know if that's the sort of information you're seeking.

David

 

bbronco 

Customer

 29 Jun 2017 05:13 UTCThu 29 Jun 2017 - 5:13 am UTC 

Yes, this is what I needed to know. I think my question is answered, thank you! How do I mark it answered?

 

Uclue Admin 

 29 Jun 2017 07:25 UTCThu 29 Jun 2017 - 7:25 am UTC 

Hi bbronco,

To mark a question as answered, look for the orange stripe marked "Actions" and choose the "Accept and rate" link.

Best Regards,
Uclue Customer Care

 

Roger Browne 

Researcher

 29 Jun 2017 09:37 UTCThu 29 Jun 2017 - 9:37 am UTC 

bbronco,

I have some additional comments to offer. As per Uclue's disclaimers, my comments are not in any way medical advice.

As you imply in the last paragraph of your question, outcomes may be better when a procedure is performed by someone who does these procedures all of the time. However, this does not need to be an entire mouth procedure. A single implant can be placed by a dentist who specializes in implants, or by a periodontist (who works full-time with gums and implants).

I have one single implant, which was placed ten years ago. I found the procedure quite uncomfortable and unpleasant. I would be most reluctant to have a full mouth procedure of this type without general anesthesia. There are some risks associated with general anesthesia, and I would not have general anesthesia for dental work except at a specialist clinic which is fully-equipped for the management of side-effects. According to American Anesthesiology:

"Minor side effects can include sore throat, headache, nausea and/or vomiting, sleepiness, muscle aches and fatigue. A very rare, but serious complication is called aspiration pneumonia (stomach contents are inhaled into your lungs). This is why you must follow the eating and drinking restrictions outlined in your preoperative instructions. Other rare complications include severe allergic reaction, blood pressure problems, heart problems and stroke."
http://aaga.americananesthesiology.com/body.cfm?id=60&action=detail&ref=1

I'm in the United Kingdom, where general dentists have stopped using general anesthetic. The following UK-based article is not addressing implants, but gives some background on the risks of general anesthetic, and how to mitigate those risks. The page is by "Dental Fear Central", but there is also a link at the bottom of the page to a government report.

http://www.dentalfearcentral.org/help/sedation-dentistry/general-anaesthetic/

Modern full-jaw implants can be supported by only four to eight implants into the jawbone, rather than requiring one implant per tooth. This seems to me a desirable way of reducing the extent of the surgery required. Here are personal accounts from two people who had this done, one under local anesthetic and one under general anesthetic:

"RealSelf"
https://www.realself.com/review/kent-4-dental-implants-truthful-experience?offset=0&sle=0
https://www.realself.com/review/louisville-ky-dental-implants-month-terrified?offset=5&sle=0

Here are some additional details that you may find interesting:

In a systematic review, 97.2% of implants were successful:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25790741

Free-hand placement of implants was as successful as computer-guided placement, but the computer-guided method resulted in less pain and swelling after the operation:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25237668

Research (from 2008) found a 98.4% success rate for dental implants, but that 12.4% required follow-up surgery:
http://www.aae.org/about-aae/news-room/press-releases/new-research-shows-dental-implants-require-significantly-more-follow-up-treatment-than-root-canals.aspx

All the best, for whatever you choose!
Roger Browne

PS: If you're doing your own internet research, the term used by practitioners is "full mouth" rather than "whole mouth" or "entire mouth".

 

bbronco 

Customer

 29 Jun 2017 19:32 UTCThu 29 Jun 2017 - 7:32 pm UTC 

Roger Browne, thank you for your comment, I am certainly interested. Much appreciated.

Uclue Admin, I can see the orange stripe marked "Actions" , this is the same stripe where I click "Add Comment", right?

However, mine only has three available actions:
Actions: Clarify | Cancel this question | Add Comment


But it does not have the "Accept and rate" link. I am so sorry, I am not trying to make it weird. Am I looking at a totally wrong place? I tried in both, Firefox and Chrome!

Here is the screenshot:
http://tinypic.com/r/kd24hg/9

 

David Sarokin 

Answer

 29 Jun 2017 20:16 UTCThu 29 Jun 2017 - 8:16 pm UTC 

bbronco,

My colleague, Roger, jumped the gun a bit. I'm reposting my earlier link to officially answer your question:

================

This link has a discussion of implants:

http://www.aestheticjawsurgery.com/blog/how-many-dental-implants-can-i-do-at-one-time
How many dental implants can I do at one time?


and considers one-at-a-time vs all-at-once from several perspectives.

There does not appear to be any advantage (in terms of outcomes, professionalism, discomfort) in spreading out the implant work over several visits, and it may well increase the overall cost due to the repeated procedures. On the other hand, there doesn't seem to be any profound disadvantage (other than cost) to the one-at-a-time approach either, if that's the patient's preference.

================


You should now be able to see the "Accept and rate" option, which you can use if you so desire. But it's optional...you don't have to do anything at this point.

Thanks again (and all the best with your dental work).

David

 

bbronco 

Customer

 29 Jun 2017 21:53 UTCThu 29 Jun 2017 - 9:53 pm UTC 

 

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