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ANSWERED on Fri 12 Oct 2007 - 4:27 pm UTC by Phil Answerfinder

Question: Looking for a Picture for my Grandmother

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astronot 

Customer

 12 Oct 2007 14:11 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 2:11 pm UTC 

When she was little, like maybe 5, she used to pull a chair
up to a painting or poster in her parents house and look at it. It was a
picture of a soldier leaving for the war looking back at his faithful
dog and saying something like "not this time old pal." When someone told
her what the words said she remembers crying as she looked at the
picture. She doesn't know if it was a Norman Rockwell print or something
else. Also she doesn't know what happened to the picture when her
father's stuff was divided after his death. Can you find out something
about this picture for me? I looked at some Rockwell prints on the
internet but didn't see that one. Grandmother would have been 5 in 1925.

 

astronot 

Customer

 12 Oct 2007 14:15 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 2:15 pm UTC 

I'm looking to buy a print of this picture if one can be found.

 

David Sarokin 

Researcher

 12 Oct 2007 14:37 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 2:37 pm UTC 

I can't find my copy of Winnie the Pooh (the original...not the Disney), but ask your grandmother if she read those stories when she was young.  They were published in the 1920's, and the scene sounds a lot like Christopher Robn going off to school, and leaving Pooh behind. 

There may have been an illustration to that effect.  If I can find the book (which my kids have outgrown, I'm afraid) I'll take a look. 

It's a shot in the dark, I know, but....

David

 

Phil Answerfinder 

Answer

 12 Oct 2007 16:27 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 4:27 pm UTC 

Dear astronot,

I have identified the picture for you, but it appears that there is no decent size print that you would be able to buy. However, you may be able to use the images below to produce a small copy of it for your Grandmother.

The picture is titled “Not This Trip, Old Pal” and it is by the American artist Arthur Davenport Fuller  (1889 - 1966).

The picture is 40.50" x 26" on oil, signed and created in 1917. It was up for auction in Feb 2002, but I am unable to identified the current owner.

There is a good copy of the picture here.: 4.45 x 6.9 inches.
http://www.askart.com/askart/f/arthur_davenport_fuller/arthur_davenport_fuller.aspx

Another copy here (slightly darker, similar size).
http://www.americanillustrators.com/artist.php?id=11633
A companion picture of the return home is here.
http://www.americanillustrators.com/artist.php?id=11634

The picture was used on Hercules Powder Co,. calendar in 1928 (bottom left)
http://members.boardhost.com/lcsmith/msg/1187825576.html

I have searched several image databases and while finding other Fuller posters, I have not seen this one.

I hope I have identified the image you were seeking. If not, then please do ask for clarification of my answer.

Phil
answerfinder

Search strategy
Eventually found a reference to it on a9.com search engine: "not this time old pal"

 

astronot 

Customer

 12 Oct 2007 16:52 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 4:52 pm UTC 

Great Answer and very prompt.

 

Phil Answerfinder 

Researcher

 12 Oct 2007 16:54 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 4:54 pm UTC 

I have found a little more information on the picture which may interest you.

It was commissioned by the Hercules Powder Co, for their calendar.

"Donald Kirtley, Vice President-Public Affairs, walks me around the place and shows-off some of the company's impressive art collection. Between 1918 and 1958 Hercules published an annual calendar. The first calendar was published for the year 1918 with a reproduction of a commissioned oil painting by A.D. Fuller entitled "Not This Trip, Old Pal". It depicted an American serviceman leaving for duty during World War I. Over the years, oils and watercolors commissioned reflected the events at the time."
http://www.corporatetrivia.com/archive/68.html

 

David Sarokin 

Researcher

 12 Oct 2007 17:04 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 5:04 pm UTC 

Very nice job (and so much for my Pooh theory).

 

Rob Bowler 

Researcher

 12 Oct 2007 19:35 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 7:35 pm UTC 

Here is a larger photonegative of the painting in black & white:

http://ulibimage.ucdavis.edu/speccoll/east01/full/G-91.jpg

 

pinkfreud 

Researcher

 12 Oct 2007 20:35 UTCFri 12 Oct 2007 - 8:35 pm UTC 

"Illustrated calendars were an important form of
advertising in the first half of the twentieth century.
The Hercules Powder Company issued their first
calendar in 1918, illustrated by Arthur D. Price. The
picture, entitled Not this Trip, Old Pal, showed an
American soldier going off to war and saying good-bye
to his hunting dog at the front gate of their home. This
sentimental image was used by Hercules in print ads
and in point-of-sale displays as well as on the calendar,
and became very popular. The following year the
painting on the company’s calendar, by Norman Price,
was called Bagged in France and showed the soldier’s
parents with a German helmet sent to them by their
son. Note the same dog and front gate in the picture.
Finally, in 1920, the calendar, painted once again by
Fuller, showed the soldier coming home to A Surprise
Party, as he was met at that same gate by his dog, who
now had a large litter of puppies. The Pictorial
Collections Department of the Hagley Museum and
Library has copies of all three of these calendar posters,
as well as the point-of-sale version of the first one. The
original paintings were retained by Hercules."

http://www.hagley.lib.de.us/2003-1.pdf

 

Phil Answerfinder 

Researcher

 13 Oct 2007 08:15 UTCSat 13 Oct 2007 - 8:15 am UTC 

You will see in the comment above, my colleague, Pinkfreud (on the ball as ever), has found a museum which may have the poster. This is the contact for the museum.
http://www.hagley.lib.de.us/contact.html

(Thank you Pink.)

Phil
asnwerfinder

 

fifi 

User

 22 Dec 2007 20:14 UTCSat 22 Dec 2007 - 8:14 pm UTC 

I am the manager of the St.Vincent dePaul Thrift Store Marshfield Wisconsin
We are in possession of a 12.5" by 20.5" print of Arthur Davenport Fuller's work "Not this trip, Old Pal". The print is on cardboard with the notation Frame 4216 John Bi--ham on the reverse. It was donated to us in a metal frame with glass. The piece has been in a storage area for some time, ten years as far as I know. I am interested in the value of the item.
Thank you.

 

myoarin 

User

 22 Dec 2007 22:38 UTCSat 22 Dec 2007 - 10:38 pm UTC 

Will a Researcher please post a clarification so that Astronot gets an email about Fifi's posting?

Here is the address and telephone number of the St. Vincent de Paul thrift store:

169 N Central Ave
Marshfield, WI 54449
(715) 387-3636

 

Uclue Admin 

 23 Dec 2007 10:56 UTCSun 23 Dec 2007 - 10:56 am UTC 

Myoarin, after a question is answered, only the answering researcher can post clarifications - so the ball is in answerfinder's court.

Uclue really needs to come up with a way to allow ongoing notifications to customers who want them, without flooding them with an email for every comment.

 

Phil Answerfinder 

Researcher

 24 Dec 2007 08:45 UTCMon 24 Dec 2007 - 8:45 am UTC 

Dear astronot,
You may be interested in the recent postings above.

 

astronot 

Customer

 24 Dec 2007 15:02 UTCMon 24 Dec 2007 - 3:02 pm UTC 

Wow.  Yall are amazing.  I've forwarded the contact info on to my father who will be in touch.

 

myoarin 

User

 25 Dec 2007 13:40 UTCTue 25 Dec 2007 - 1:40 pm UTC 

It must be the Christmas season.  :-)

The nice thing is that this is the second or third (fourth?) time someone, who until then had not commented, signed on to Uclue with firsthand information.  Real nice.

 

ooma1946 

User

 29 May 2011 03:05 UTCSun 29 May 2011 - 3:05 am UTC 

If you are still looking for this picture, I have it.  I purchased it at an auction.  The writing on the back says it hung in a military museum.  I was drawn to it.

 

dunc 

User

 9 Mar 2016 20:41 UTCWed 9 Mar 2016 - 8:41 pm UTC 

I have 3 original cardboard posters

1) not this trip old pal
2)a surprise party
3)bagged in France

all 3 have the same fence in the background and all 3 have dogs . They are in wooden frames.

since original and open to the elements they are starting to fade . Is there something recommended to preserve them ?
Also does anyone have a value they may hold price wise .
Thank you

 

Uclue Admin 

 9 Mar 2016 20:44 UTCWed 9 Mar 2016 - 8:44 pm UTC 

Hi dunc,

Thanks for your interest in this question.

Uclue is a paid research service. If you would like a researcher to look into your question, you would need to post a new question and fund it using PayPal. This page is for discussion and answers to the question posted by astronot.

Best Regards,
Uclue Customer Care

 

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